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Jeremiah Hall
Jeremiah Hall

Gas Turbines: Internal Flow Systems Modeling Pdf



A gas turbine, also called a combustion turbine, is a type of continuous flow internal combustion engine. The main parts common to all gas turbine engines form the power-producing part (known as the gas generator or core) and are, in the direction of flow:




Gas Turbines: Internal Flow Systems Modeling pdf



The basic operation of the gas turbine is a Brayton cycle with air as the working fluid: atmospheric air flows through the compressor that brings it to higher pressure; energy is then added by spraying fuel into the air and igniting it so that the combustion generates a high-temperature flow; this high-temperature pressurized gas enters a turbine, producing a shaft work output in the process, used to drive the compressor; the unused energy comes out in the exhaust gases that can be repurposed for external work, such as directly producing thrust in a turbojet engine, or rotating a second, independent turbine (known as a power turbine) that can be connected to a fan, propeller, or electrical generator. The purpose of the gas turbine determines the design so that the most desirable split of energy between the thrust and the shaft work is achieved. The fourth step of the Brayton cycle (cooling of the working fluid) is omitted, as gas turbines are open systems that do not reuse the same air.


Most gas turbines are internal combustion engines but it is also possible to manufacture an external combustion gas turbine which is, effectively, a turbine version of a hot air engine.Those systems are usually indicated as EFGT (Externally Fired Gas Turbine) or IFGT (Indirectly Fired Gas Turbine).


Problems and solutions presented in this chapter are typically found gas turbine secondary air flow systems, which are important for cooling and sealing of various critical components subjected to high temperatures. They include finding changes in pressure and temperature in isentropic compressible free and forced vortex flows and a nonisentropic generalized vortex; finding static pressure variation in a radially outward flow in rotating constant- and variable-area ducts; analyzing impingement air cooling of a cylindrical surface with a rotary arm with three jets; calculating axial thrust of a centrifugal air compressor rotor; calculating heat transfer in a rotating duct of arbitrary cross section; calculating windage temperature rise in a rotor-stator cavity; analyzing a two-tooth labyrinth two-tooth labyrinth seal under various operating conditions; and calculating pressure and temperature changes in rotating radial pipes carrying compressor bleed air flow for turbine cooling. For a deeper understanding of various concepts used in these problems and their solutions, readers are encouraged to review these concepts in Gas Turbines: Internal Flow Systems Modeling (Cambridge Aerospace Series #44, 2019) by Bijay K. Sultanian.


Introduction to manufacturing system modeling and analysis. Fundamental principles of production systems. Analytical and simulation approach to production system performance analysis, continuous improvement, and design. Topics include mathematical modeling of production systems, production lines with various statistic distribution models of machine reliability, improvement analysis and real-time decision making. Includes both the relevant fundamental concepts and the extensive practical knowledge base on which manufacturing research, development, and design depend. The students are expected to complete a project, in which they will interpret real-life manufacturing plant operation in the light of course principles and suggest improvement solutions.


Differential and integral formulation. Exact and approximate solutions. Topics include parallel and boundary layer flows, similarity solutions, external and internal flows, laminar and turbulent convection, and forced and free convection.


Lagrangian and Eulerian frames. Dynamical equations of momentum and energy transfer. Two-dimensional dynamics of incompressible and barotropic perfect fluids and of the compressible perfect gas. Conformal mapping applied to two-dimensional fluid dynamics. Jets and cavities. Surface waves, internal waves. Perfect shear flows.


Introduction of finite difference, finite volume, and finite element methods for incompressible flows and heat transfer. Topics include explicit and implicit schemes, accuracy, stability and convergence, derived and primitive-variables formulation, orthogonal and non-orthogonal coordinate systems. Selected computer assignments from heat conduction, incompressible flows, forced and free convection.


This graduate course will concentrate on the design concept development of the product development cycle, from the creative phase of solution development to preliminary concept evaluation and selection. The course will then cover methods for mathematical modeling, computer simulation and optimization. The concept development component of the course will also cover intellectual property and patent issues. The course will not concentrate on the development of any particular class of products, but the focus will be mainly on mechanical and electromechanical devices and systems. As part of the course, each participant will select an appropriate project to practice the application of the material covered in the course and prepare a final report.


This course will cover the fundamentals of dynamic modeling and controltechniques for robots, focusing mainly on robot manipulators. The dynamic modeling part includes Lagrange formulation, NewtonEuler formulation, properties of the dynamic equations, and trajectory planning with dynamic constraints, and the control part includes nonlinear systems, state-space representation, Lyapunov stability theorems, feedback linearization, linear controller design, position control, motion control, inverse dynamics control, robust control, adaptive control,force control, impedance control, hybrid motionforce control, and implementation of controllers.


An introduction to the design, modeling, analysis and control of mechatronic systems (smart systems comprising mechanical, electrical, and software components). Fundamentals of the basic components needed for the design and control of mechatronic systems, including sensors, actuators, data acquisition systems, microprocessors, programmable logic controllers, and I/O systems, are covered. Hands-on experience in designing and building practical mechatronic systems are provided through integrated lab activities.


Basic thermodynamics concepts, properties of pure substances, first and second law analysis of systems and control volumes. M E 300 Engineering Thermodynamics I (3) This course is designed to develop an understanding of thermodynamic concepts and their application for the student by providing an integrative modeling and analysis approach to thermal-fluids systems. The course emphasizes the integration and application of fundamental principles of mass and energy conservation and fundamental ideal gas and non-ideal working fluids concepts to fundamental engineering systems. These systems include basic spark-ignition engines and turbojet engines as well as basic and extended Rankine and refrigeration cycles. Emphasis is on creating engineering models of these systems and indicating how the idealized versions of these systems can be extended to more realistic descriptions. Besides these mass and energy conservation concepts the course introduces the basic concepts of heat transfer and mass flow, providing a foundation in these subjects to be further expanded in later courses. The course aims to develop knowledge and initiate skills for "thinking like an engineer."


This course is an introduction to fluid mechanics, and emphasizes fundamental concepts and problem-solving techniques. Topics to be covered include fluid properties (density, viscosity, vapor pressure, surface tension); fluid statics (hydrostatic pressure, pressure forces on planar and curved surfaces); fluid kinematics (flow visualization, vorticity, Reynolds transport theorem); control volume analysis (conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy, Bernoulli equation); dimensional analysis (dimensional homogeneity, method of repeating variables, experimental testing, similarity); internal flows (pipe flows, major and minor losses, piping networks, matching pumps to systems); differential analysis (Navier-Stokes equation, creeping flow, potential flow, boundary layers); external flows (lift and drag, pressure vs. friction drag); and compressible flow (isentropic flow through nozzles, shock waves). Brief introductions to computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and turbomachinery (pumps and turbines) will also be provided.


Fundamentals of statistics, sensors, instrumentation, and measurement of mechanical phenomena such as temperature, flow, pressure, force, stress, displacement, and acceleration. M E 345 Instrumentation, Measurements, and Statistics (4) This course is required for all mechanical engineering students. It serves as an introduction to the fundamental principles of instrumentation and measurement, along with statistics, and integrates and applies what the students have learned in their electrical engineering course. The course includes a 3-hour-per-week hands-on laboratory where students apply the material learned in the lecture. For many students this is the first time they have actual hands-on experience with electronics and measurement equipment, such as oscilloscopes, breadboards, function generators, digital data acquisition systems, integrated circuits strain gages, displacement meters, thermocouples, tachometers, dynamometers, filters, volume flow meters, velocity meters, pressure transducers, etc. Students learn not only how to use these devices in the lab, but also the fundamental principles of their operation. Statistical analysis is integrated into the course, especially in the hands-on laboratories, where statistics is used to analyze and interpret acquired data.


ME 348 Circuit Analysis, Instrumentation, and Statistics (4) This course is required for all mechanical engineering students, and is taken in the junior year. It serves as an introduction to the fundamental principles of circuit analysis, instrumentation and measurement, as well as statistics. The course includes a 3-hour-per-week, hands-on laboratory where students explore the concepts taught in the lecture. For many students this is the first time they have actual hands-on experience with electronics and measurement equipment, such as oscilloscopes, breadboards, function generators, digital data acquisition systems, integrated circuits strain gages, displacement meters, thermocouples, tachometers, dynamometers, filters, volume flow meters, velocity meters, pressure transducers, etc. Students learn not only how to use these devices in the lab, but also the fundamental principles of their operation. Statistical analysis is integrated into the course, especially in the hands-on laboratories, where statistics is used to analyze and interpret acquired data.


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